Clients... you have got to get better at selling your roles!

It doesn’t take a genius to realise we live in a candidate driven market these days. Recent research suggests that for every software developer in the UK there are 5.3 open roles, and that doesn’t include the passive vacancies that some hiring managers have.

Now more than ever, clients have to get comfortable really selling their roles to potential candidates. My experience suggests that some (but not all) clients can’t (or won’t) sell their roles. They hope that the candidate will somehow figure out that this is a great place to work. Well, more often than not they won’t.

“Selling”, for lack of a better word, your role doesn’t have to be awkward or corny if you know how to go about it. So, I want to grasp the nettle and talk about three easy things you can do to really sell your role and boost your chances of bagging that gold star candidate!

Here we go…

  1. Talk about your values & vision

 

If you don’t know your company’s values and visions then stop reading this and find out what they are. Don’t worry this blog can wait…

Values and vision are so important and rarely get talked about in an interview. They are the reason the company exist. They show how they see the world. They tell the candidate what problem they solve and why the company is special. Fundamentally they are THE most important thing any manager should be telling a candidate. Without this you really are just another company doing stuff. Without articulating your values and vision to a candidate you have no story to tell.

Believe me every candidate wants to hear a story, and in turn, have a story to tell their friends and family when they become an employee. No one wants to join an average company to do average work. Your company values and vision tell a wonderful story. Make sure you tell it.

  1. Talk about why YOU work there

 

There is (I hope) a reason you work where you work beyond just collecting a paycheck. If there isn’t, then a perspective candidate will pick up on that and you may as well wear a badge on your shirt saying, “I HATE IT HERE”.

I am sure that is not you. You love your job, you love your co-workers and you love your company. Tell people that. Rock star candidates want to work for rock star businesses that just ooze appeal as soon as you walk through the door. This really shines through if you (the hiring manager) can really tell a story as to why you work there, why you love it there, why you wouldn’t consider working for any other business because it’s so great where you are.

 

  1. Talk about perks

 

A lot of clients think that money is the key to solving all of their candidate attraction woes. Yes, more money is a big help, but I often find there is more to attracting the right people than just throwing cash at them.

Non-cash benefits are a big deal these days. I have seen candidate turn down more money from one client to take a lower offer from another because they offered better training and progression, more holiday, flexi-time, working from home, autonomy and flexibility.

Money is great, but often there will be something on the table that a candidate will value more than money (in my experience it is often flexibility). Figure out what your whole package is, know it and tell the candidate what it is (and your recruiter too for that matter). Don’t say “oh, HR deal with that”. Perks can be a valuable part of your story and are so much nicer to talk about than money.

It is your job to “sell” your role to a candidate. Don’t fall into the trap of assuming they will figure it out, because they won’t. When “selling” your roles remember to tell a story. People remember stories. People get excited about stories. People repeat stories. Know your story and tell it to every candidate

What has been your experience of “selling” a role to a candidate? Perhaps you have some knowledge that you can share here to help others. Perhaps you have great tips that really work for you… tell us about it.

Don’t forget the best jobs can be found at:

http://thisisnoa.com/jobs/